WAGE INEQUALITY AND INNOVATIVE INTELLIGENCE-BIASED TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE

  • Taiji HARASHIMA Department of Economics Kanazawa Seiryo University, Japan

Abstract

In this paper, “innovative intelligence–biased technological change” (IIBTC) is examined as an alternative to the traditional concept of skill-biased technological change (SBTC) as a source of increases in wage inequality. The innovative intelligence of ordinary or average workers is an important element in productivity and can be heterogeneous across workers. Because technologies are heterogeneous in that they have different characteristics and are used in different situations, some technologies are “innovative intelligence-biased” and are advantageous for workers with relatively high innovative intelligence. If IIBTC prevails over a certain period of time, these workers become additionally advantaged and thereby wage inequality will increase during the period.

References

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Published
2018-09-04
How to Cite
HARASHIMA, Taiji. WAGE INEQUALITY AND INNOVATIVE INTELLIGENCE-BIASED TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE. Theoretical and Practical Research in the Economic Fields, [S.l.], v. 9, n. 1, p. 17-24, sep. 2018. ISSN 2068-7710. Available at: <https://journals.aserspublishing.eu/tpref/article/view/2220>. Date accessed: 20 jan. 2019.